Super Tuesday and Beyond

This past Tuesday, March 1, was “Super Tuesday” in the world of politics. On Super Tuesday, 11 states for each party held primaries or caucuses which makes Super Tuesday one of the most important days in the presidential race.

sanders trump clinton  Results on both sides were, as expected, won mostly by each party’s frontrunner. On the Republican side, Donald Trump won seven of the 11 states (Alabama, Arkansas, Georgia, Massachusetts, Tennessee, Vermont, and Virginia) with Ted Cruz winning three others (Alaska, Oklahoma, and Texas) and Marco Rubio receiving his first win in Minnesota. On the Democratic side, Hillary Clinton won seven of the states (Alaska, Arkansas, Georgia, Massachusetts, Tennessee, Texas and Virginia), and Bernie Sanders won three swing states (Colorado, Minnesota, and Oklahoma) as well as his home state of Vermont.

A number of things can be taken away from this past week’s primaries. First of all, a Trump nomination may be inevitable at this point. While Cruz has had some small victories, he has nowhere near the support Trump does, and he’s not projected to win in any upcoming primaries. Trump’s victories also led to the dropping out of Ben Carson, and the continued failure of John Kasich. kasich carsonWhile Kasich remains in the race, he has virtually no chance of receiving the nomination. Sanders’s victories in these states show that his campaign is not slowing down. While Clinton has had a number of victories in southern and traditionally conservative states, Sanders is still competitive, and has a huge following among northern and progressive states. Sanders’s most recent victories this past Saturday prove that while Clinton is the frontrunner, it is still early in this presidential race and he still has a great chance for the democratic nomination.

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