Small Towns – Every Vote Counts

In election years, small-towns not only have few people, but few voters as well. These are not typically “hot-spots” for campaigning either. But, it is imaginable that if the presidential candidates could clone themselves by 100 times, there is a great possibility that these candidates would focus on some of the smaller towns.

With a fully rural population of about 1,500, Mount Pleasant Township citizens bring their small-town values to the table on this Election Day as well.

According to data found onwww.city-data.com, “88% of Mount Pleasant residents drive a car to work, and over 50% of residents use fuel to heat their homes.”

A number one issue to the people of Mount Pleasant are fuel prices. However, someone who rides mass transit or walks to work in Philadelphia may be focused more on the effect of greenhouse gases on our environment. This same principle could theoretically be applied to students living on Bloomsburg’s campus without a vehicle.

Unfortunately, small areas such as Mount Pleasant cannot compete with the amount of voting potential as Philadelphia or Pittsburgh, and sometimes their voices cannot be clearly heard as well as they would like them to be.

Mount Pleasant Township Community Center
Mount Pleasant Township Community Center

It would be great if presidents could campaign in small towns, but these factors disable the idea…

·Time Commitment – Why speak to a crowd of 200 voters when you could speak to a crowd of 200,000?

·Resources Management – As a politician, are you  going to start campaigning for the 2012 election now? One would have to if they planned on hitting every single small town in the U.S.

Besides, if the president you’re hoping for is within 50 miles from your home, you would consider making the small commute, wouldn’t you?

Despite these common campaign problems, one thing will never change which is, that every vote counts. Incredible numbers of new voters have been registered for this election, and many new political strategies have been implemented. These new call-to-actions may have numerous new influences on how the public thinks about both politics and technology as well.

The internet is such a powerful campaigning tool, maybe the presidential candidates have cloned themselves via Wi-Fi rather well, maybe just not by 100 times just yet.

Comments

comments